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Taylor Made: The Cost and Consequences of New York's Public-Sector Labor Laws
by Terry O'Neil and E.J. McMahon

Defusing New York's Public Pension Bomb: A Fair Approach for Workers and Taxpayers
by E.J. McMahon

 
Early retirement for state workers: Money-saver, or costly sweetener?
May 2010

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March 2010

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October 07, 2010

Renegotiate our contract? Not a chance says union.

When the city of Troy asked its Civil Service Employees Association (CSEA) employees to consider forgoing a 3.5 percent raise this year, a CSEA spokesperson said, "...we do not renegotiate our contracts. It's a moot point," according to the Troy Record.

Deputy Mayor Dan Crawley replied:

What if there were layoffs? Would they renegotiate then?

(snip)

Maybe we're in the trouble we're in [New York state] because the CSEA doesn't renegotiate contracts. At some point the people are going to get tired of it.

Troy's budget includes a 5.5 percent tax increase.

Meanwhile the, Kingston Daily Freeman reports that Orange County will lay off 39 employees, Sullivan County could lay off 15 employees and that some Ulster County employees deserve a raise but, "now is not necessarily the time..."

In Wayne County, village of Macedon residents will vote on whether or not to dissolve the village into the town, reducing costs associated with maintaining the municipality. A Canandaigua Messenger editorial concludes:

It's time for over-taxed property owners in the village of Macedon to take matters into their own hands to reduce costs where they can. Dissolution offers that opportunity for financial relief.

Municipalities and public sector workers across the state are making concessions in tough economic times. Maybe it's time for CSEA to start pitching in.

Posted by Tim Hoefer

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